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International study on the implementation of the UN convention on the rights of persons with disabilities – Employement, work and vocational education & training
Tuesday, 03 July 2018

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International study on the implementation of the UN convention on the rights of persons with disabilities – Employement, work and vocational education & training
Michael Fembek, Ingrid Heindorf , Wilfried Kainz, Amelie Saupe

This Report is composed of three main sections:

  • Social Indicators: The Zero Project Survey 2016–2017 consisted of 21 questions covering the most important themes of the UN CRPD, but with an additional focus this year on employment and vocational and educational training. After five years of Social Indicator research, for the first time data trends are published as well as comparisons between world regions. The Social Indicators section also includes analysis of data availability on youth employment with regards to Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 8, and of the “data gap” of persons with disabilities living in institutions – another reference to the SDGs.
  • Innovative Practices: 56 Innovative Practices have been selected, and 13 common solutions and “threads” have been identified.
  • Innovative Policies: 11 Innovative Policies have been selected, and 13 ways to create a significant impact have been identified.

 

Read more about this report on the Resource Center Applied Research and Disability

 
Living well with disability: needs, values and competing factors
Tuesday, 26 June 2018

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Living well with disability: needs, values and competing factors

Suzie Mudge, Nicola M. Kayes, Verna A. Stavric, Alexis S. Channon, Paula Kersten, Kathryn M. McPherson

Background: Obesity is more prevalent for disabled people (estimated as being between 27-62%) compared to the general population (17-22%). Disabled people are more likely to report poorer general health and acquire a range of obesity-related secondary conditions. Although there are many physical activity and nutrition initiatives aimed at obesity prevention, little is known about whether these options are relevant and accessible for disabled people. The Living Well Study aimed to better understand the issues faced by disabled people when engaging in physical activity and healthy eating.

Methods: The study drew on a participatory action research design involving key stakeholders. There were two core cyclical phases (A and B), in which data collection was followed by a period of analysis, reflection and refinement. Focus groups and interviews were held with individuals who experience a range of disabilities, family members, service providers and representatives from disability advocacy groups. We sought to explore the importance and meaning of physical activity and healthy eating and factors that influenced engagement in these. Data in phase A were analysed using conventional content analysis drawing on constant comparative methods to identify themes of importance. In phase B, data analysis occurred alongside data collection, using a structured template to summarise participants’ agreement or disagreement with the draft themes and recommendations, until the themes and recommendations were refined based on participants’ corroboration.

Results: 146 participants aged between 10–69 years, from both rural and urban areas and of different cultural backgrounds participated. Seven interconnecting themes that related to engagement in living well behaviours emerged with a wide range of external factors (such as people, knowledge, time, cost, identity and the environment) impacting on living well options. The central theme - It depends: needs, values and competing factors - emphasised the complexity faced by a disabled person when balancing the external factors with their own personal values and needs in order to arrive at a decision to engage in healthy living behaviours.

Conclusions: Although disabled people experience similar issues when participating in healthy living behaviours as those living without disability, additional factors need to be addressed in order to improve opportunities for ‘living well’ in these populations. This information has implications for health professionals to target the relevance and content of interventions.

 

Read more about this research on our resource center applied research and disability

 
How children with autism spectrum disorder behave and explore the 4-dimensional(SPATIAL 3D+TIME) environment during a joint attention induction task with a robot
Thursday, 19 April 2018

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How children with autism spectrum disorder behave and explore the 4-dimensional(SPATIAL 3D+TIME) environment during a joint attention induction task with a robot
The MICHELANGELO Study Group, David Cohen, Mohamed Chetouani, Koushik Maharatna, Nicolas Bodeau, Anne-Lise Jouen, Jean Xavier, Sofiane Boucenna, Elodie Tilmont, Maria Salvatore Anzalone

We aimed to compare, during a joint attention (JA) elicitation task, how children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and children with typical development (TD) behave and explore their 4 dimensional (meaning spatial 3D + time) when interacting with a human or with a robotic agent.

We built a system that employed a Nao robot and a perception system based on a RGB-D sensor (Kinect) to capture social engagement cues. A JA induction experiment was performed in which children with ASD (N= 16) and matched TD children (N= 16) had a 3-min interaction with the robot or with a therapist. Nao induced JA by gazing; by gazing and pointing; and by gazing, pointing and vocalizing at pictures. Both groups of children performed well with the therapist. However, with Nao, both groups had lower JA scores, and the children with ASD had a significantly lower score than the TD children. We found that (i) multimodal JA induction was more efficient in both groups; (ii) the 3D spatial world gaze exploration showed less accuracy; and (iii) the trunk position in ASD showed less stability in the 4 dimensions compared to TD controls. We conclude that, in ASD, JA skill depends on the interaction partner, and implies a higher motor and cognitive cost.


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